Tag Archives: photography

Here’s the same picture taken with every iPhone that has existed

Here's the same picture taken with every iPhone that has existed

Though the new iPhone is called the iPhone 6, we’re actually on the 8th generation of iPhone that has existed. But who cares about that. Let’s just see how much the camera—maybe the most important feature on the iPhone after messaging—has improved over those 8 generations. Hint: a lot.

Lisa Bettany compared the new iPhone 6 camera to those of the iPhone 5S, iPhone 5, iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 3G and original iPhone by taking the same shot on each. The particular shot above shows the camera’s performance when backlit. You can definitely see the difference when you zoom up close.

Here’s a portrait comparison:

Here's the same picture taken with every iPhone that has existed

And a very impressive lowlight:

Here's the same picture taken with every iPhone that has existed

You can see the comparison in much more detail here. In short: it gets better. Duh. But it’s impressive to see by how much. Things might look good from afar on all of them but the cameras of the early iPhones were pathetic shooters. Things that used to be unusable can actually be considered stunning now and what worked in perfect conditions, works even better now.

Teens go bananas and take scariest selfie ever atop 1135-foot skyscraper

Teens go bananas and take scariest selfie ever atop 1135-foot skyscraper

Holy crap this gives me vertigo!

I’ve seen many coldblooded daredevils climbing skyscrapers and towers, but this is the first time I’ve seen someone having a picnic up there—The Centre skyscraper in Hong Kong, 1,135 feet (346 meters) above the ground. I couldn’t avoid gasping when photographer Daniel Lau lifted his camera above him and his friends.

Time-lapse shows how it feels to be drunk at the local fair

 

Time-lapse shows how it feels to be drunk at the local fair

We all know the deal: Deep fried food, horrible music, rigged shooting games and cheap alcohol. But there is something about local fairs that makes them irresistible. This time-lapse shows what that thing is. A wonderful world of lights, colors and big moving objects that feels like a dream.

Or a psychedelic nightmare, depending of your degree of drunkness.


 

These Trippy Cross-Section Portraits Were Made Without Photoshop

These Trippy Cross-Section Portraits Were Made Without Photoshop

Berlin-based artist Michael Lamoller uses analogue editing techniques to create super trippy timelapse portraits of people in a series called “Tatochronos.” The portraits are collaged upon one another from several printed images, cut up, and then layered. The look results in a cutaway-style collage of a person.

These Trippy Cross-Section Portraits Were Made Without Photoshop

Lamoller takes several photos as the subject changes clothing or leaves the frame and comes back, and then prints each photo individually. Once he has the photos, he prints them, layers them where they fit into a portrait/collage image, and cuts away parts to wind up with an image that demonstrates the layers of a person.

These Trippy Cross-Section Portraits Were Made Without Photoshop

 

As the art world continues to move into an increasingly high-tech workflow, Lomoller’s work is an incredible demonstration of how not all editing needs to be done on a computer. The distinct look of a collage done by hand can provide a unique experience that many more modern artists might never consider. [Michael Lomoller via Wired]

The Police Can’t Order You To Stop Filming Them In Public, Or Force You To Delete Pics From Phone

An Al Jazeera TV crew being tear-gassed by authorities in Ferguson (via BoingBoing)

A good deal of the footage coming out Ferguson, Missouri, this week has been provided by non-journalists, using their phones to record and photograph events. At the same time, reports claim that police are attempting to block both ordinary citizens and journalists from documenting the situation. What these officers either don’t know or aren’t saying is that you have the legal right to photograph the police, even when they tell you not to.

GigaOm’s Jeff John Roberts has a concise piece on the topic that anyone interested should read.

In 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled [PDF] in the case of Glik v. Cunniffe that private citizens have the right to record public officials, including police, in a public place.

The court held that the First Amendment’s proscription on laws “abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press… encompasses a range of conduct related to the gathering and dissemination of information.”

The ruling cites an earlier Supreme Court pronouncement that people have the right to gather news “from any source by means within the law.”

“The filming of government officials engaged in their duties in a public place, including police officers performing their responsibilities, fits comfortably within these principles,” wrote the Appeals Court. “Gathering information about government officials in a form that can readily be disseminated to others serves a cardinal First Amendment interest in protecting and promoting ‘the free discussion of governmental affairs.’”

The Supremes had previously stated that “[f]reedom of expression has particular significance with respect to government because ‘[i]t is here that the state has a special incentive to repress opposition and often wields a more effective power of suppression.’”

And the First Circuit said this applies even more so to law enforcement officials, as they “are granted substantial discretion that may be misused to deprive individuals of their liberties.”

“Ensuring the public’s right to gather information about their officials not only aids in the uncovering of abuses but also may have a salutary effect on the functioning of government more generally,” wrote the court.

The Glik ruling also acknowledged limitations to citizens’ rights to record public officials.

“It may be subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions,” the First Circuit explained. And though it did not specifically prescribe what those limitations might be, the court noted that “peaceful recording of an arrest in a public space that does not interfere with the police officers’ performance of their duties is not reasonably subject to limitation.”

The court explained that, much like police are expected to withstand verbal challenges from citizens without threatening arrest, this “same restraint demanded of law enforcement officers in the face of ‘provocative and challenging’ speech must be expected when they are merely the subject of videotaping that memorializes, without impairing, their work in public spaces.”

Regarding the question of whether or not police can tell you to delete photos from your phone, the recent Supreme Court rulings in Riley v. California and U.S. v. Wurie make it rather clear that they can not force you to do so.

In those cases, SCOTUS held that a warrant is needed to search a citizen’s phone, even if that citizen has been arrested. And since there is no way to tell if a photo has been taken — or what the content of a photo might be, or if it’s been deleted — without searching that phone, this tells us that an officer barking at you to “delete those photos!” can ask all that he or she wants, but it’s up to you whether or not you want to erase the images.

Scary creatures are hiding inside our washing machines

 

Scary creatures are hiding inside our washing machines

Next time you do laundry, don’t just walk away after you put the load in. You’ll miss the monsters. Because if you stare through the looking glass, you’ll discover terrifying creatures that look like they come from Guillermo del Toro’s imagination trapped inside.

Slate pointed to the work of photographer Yvette Meltzer and her photo series Revolutions. She captures pictures of what’s inside a washing machine and dryer and it’s pretty fun to see how dirty clothes and linens tumble into familiar shapes and forms that almost look like abstract art. Meltzer writes:

After taking multitudes of outdoor laundry images over the years, it was in Chicago in the cold of winter when my curiosity led me into local Laundromats where, drawn to the colors of laundry spinning in the dryers, I began taking photos. I never imagined the mandalas I would ultimately see when I went to the computer to view the digital images of this spinning laundry. Therein I saw faces and forms – both human and animal-like. Thus was born my revolving laundry series which I call “Revolutions.”

What has been most exciting for me has been capturing the abstract forms that have emerged on this journey. As Picasso said, “There is no abstract art. You must always start with something. Afterward you can remove all traces of reality.” I believe that is what this series does. I start with fabric in a dryer and in collaboration with my camera the concrete reality is transformed.

Scary creatures are hiding inside our washing machines

Scary creatures are hiding inside our washing machines

Scary creatures are hiding inside our washing machines

Scary creatures are hiding inside our washing machines

Scary creatures are hiding inside our washing machines

 

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-rays

By James Baker

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-rays

Photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick uses both chest X-ray and mammogram machines in his photography, a technique he learned when he had to develop an X-ray like look for a client—it turned out the best way was to use actual X-rays. He told us about his work.

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-rays

I’ve been working on the X-ray project for about three years now. I started with flowers and then with toys. Right now I’m working on a roast chicken dinner with rosemary and lemon. It’s a fairly gothic food shot it has to be said.

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-rays

There’s a certain amount of chance involved when choosing what to X-ray. Some subjects can be rendered unrecognisable when X-rayed and just look like a scrambled mess. I look at shapes and silhouettes. If the shape is distinctive and interesting I’m willing to take a risk on what the inside might have to offer.

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-rays

The engineering that goes into these essentially disposable objects is really incredible. There’s a lot of talent out there in those anonymous industrial estates.

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-raysThe Chinook Helicopter has a charming mechanism. The back door drops down, a tank and a soldier emerge, fire a few rounds then go back inside and the ramp closes behind them. All the while the whole thing is circling the floor while the rotors spin, there’s loads of engine noise and gunfire and the lights flash. You have to admire the guy who put that much care and character and charm into a two dollar toy.

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-rays

I have to mention the Talking Cat and Dog image. They didn’t look like much in the store but I reckoned they looked stupid enough to work. You know you’re looking at a cat and a dog but you’ve seen them like this. Somehow they look like a couple. The pieces of tape holding the wiring in place I’ve not seen in another toy. They make me think of bandages, which adds to the dog vs cat relationship.

Cheap toys look surprisingly cool through X-rays

Brendan Fitzpatrick is a professional photographer based in Sydney, Australia. 

You can visit Brendan’s website and follow him on Facebook.

Modern Photography Would Not Exist Without George Eastman

Modern Photography Would Not Exist Without George Eastman

George Eastman, inventor, businessman, and philanthropist, was born on this day 160 years ago. His innovations in standardized film and portable cameras made the nascent field of photography accessible to the layperson. Tonight, let’s celebrate his birthday with a look back at PBS’s George Eastman: The Wizard of Photography.

This documentary, produced by WGBH, takes us through Eastman’s fascinating life and the many ways he made photography an accessible art. Yes, the production comes off a little PBS-y, like something you’d watch when your homeroom teacher called in a substitute. Look past all that. The story is great. Here it is in three parts on YouTube:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

It’s easy to forget, in this all-digital world, how something as simple as canister film and a camera you could sling around your neck could have such a huge impact on modern photography. Digital convenience is great, but film isn’t dead. And if you like the idea of being able to snap photos on the go from a small, portable device, you’ve got George Eastman to thank.

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